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20100911
20100911
STATION
KQED (PBS) 5
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> as you all know, the german marshall fund vehicle very kind to provide us with this -- has been very kind to provided us with this opportunity to have four of their european experts in bicycle planning, bicycle implementation and bicycle programs and they are experts on all aspects of the bicycle. and here in san francisco, you know, we are at this point trying to after a hiatus of three years because of court-ordered injunctions trying to implement our bike plan. so we all a collective goal, i believe, to increase the environmental and nick sustainability of the world around us that we participate in and especially in san francisco, but we do have a special responsibility because this place provides us with the opportunity that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to other alternatives to the car. so when we want to reclaim the street and the public right-of-way and the public realm for people and basic human needs of access to the humanities that urban environments p
for us. the mobility plans that local authorities are now obliged to develop, and the hearings that are organized because of that, are almost always concerning parking places. we have now a program where we are having one less car parking space. in the streets, you see, there is one car less because now bicycles can ride their bikes, but the comments are not as enthusiastic. you will have to be from the cycling movement to be happy about that. it is a hard struggle. >> you, sir? >> with health insurance, i think people are realizing it is an idea whose time has come. maybe we're trying to make the same thing with cycling. in the united states, many people, especially in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to take over the streets and will not be room for cars and we will go slower and lose jobs. have you been able to convince people? what kind of arguments
cleared, the loss was actually greater. all of us can remember where we were, what we were doing, and how we felt as the news of the attacks was broadcast over all of the news networks. most of us had the opportunity to experience those attacks through our televisions, most in the privacy of our own homes, where we were able to take in and process, and grieve over what was occurring. the people that we will be talking with today did not have that luxury of learning about the events on their televisions. these were the individuals that were on the front lines that day. they were the men and women who could not watch it on tv, but had to respond. they had to act. they had no time to grieve. they had no time to plan. they had no time to prepare. we had not prepared for what happened that day. they were called upon to improvise. their actions and their decisions could either cost lives or save lives. for me, as an airline pilot, the was not flying that day, i had a burning desire to understand what it was like for these people that were in the air traffic control facility, and the cockpit, an
a reporter, i am all about news you can use. on this panel, we have hand- selected amazing folks, each an expert in the runway on different angles of reintegration within the military and the civilian world. i am going to bounce around a little bit. out of courtesy, i like to start with our wounded warriors. front and center, we have michael. he is a recently retired wounded warrior. he has a long medical road ahead. as a former army ranger and sergeant first class, michael is adapting to this change in mission. between ongoing surgery's, he is speaking to troops about reintegration and suicide prevention, even going back to iraq, where he was hit by an ied to talk to troops. optimisticht iis his mother and full-time caregiver. they have been blessed because she says when you look at mike, she worries about those who have unseen injuries and their families in need help reintegrating. down on me and, we have -- down on the end, we have a former marine reservist. she brings a unique perspective on reintegration trade as a female wounded warrior, as a full-time student, and as eight men t
officials acknowledged her involvement, but a number of them denied this. and joining us in the studio with some insight on this story is our reporter. so, the court sharply criticized the prosecutors for the way they did their investigations of this case. presumption of guilt, how did they proceed? >> actually it looked as if the prosecutor themselves were judging in court. here is the gist of the prosecutor's argument. a man who headed a fictitious organization wanted a welfare ministry certificate that woul identify it as a group that represented the disabled. the kind of certificate allowed such organization to send mail at discount rates. and the men asked a lawmaker to help him obtain the certificate. the lawmaker asked her at the time to issue it. the support year instructed muraki to issue the certificate. she made a subordinate produce it. the prosecutors based the case chiefly on the statement made during the course of the investigation. it's that muraki told him to issue a certificate because a lawmaker asked them to do it. but he went back on his statement in court. finally
were going to be looking for us. >> a mother of two desperate, hiding, running from the law and her ex-husband. a cross-culturing marriage once happy. >> hello, mom. we're in turkey now. >> then gone sour. >> every e-mail just kept getting worse and worse and worse. >> a young mother convinced her husband was a danger to their daughters, but a foreign court awarded him custody. >> how were they going to do that, take them away from me? >> she grabbed the girls and fled. >> i put them on that boat and they took off. >> now she was a fugitive, accused of kidnapping. >> we go back to turkey, i go to tr prison. >> but what caused her fear? was it her husband or dark secrets in her own family's past? >> we did have abuse in our family. >> and what will happen to her children? >> we have two little girls that are totally innocent. >> "on the run." >>> good evening and welcome to "dateline." our story begins with a devoted mother of two, an american living oversea overseas, and he foreign-born husband. a dark fear would destroy their marriage and turn her into an international fugitive. on th
, yeah, but all these lanes are needed for car traffic. i'll tell you, if you use this traffic model, you should realize that the capacity of your system is not determined by the amount of lanes and the stretches of roads but by the capacity of intersections and you realize that the capacity of these intersections are a lot lower than any capacity of lanes that are on the stretches of roads. so it's only a parking place for cars on to the next traffic light or intersection. so it's only convincing the people to realize that there will be hardly any sacrifice if there will be face given over to cyclists. one thing and that's also the problem with being in the downturn because there is also safe by numbers. in the netherlands, cycling is inherently more safe than in the u.s.a. because all car drivers are also cyclists. 60% of the people in the netherlands cycle at least three times a week. 80% at least once a week. so all the car drivers are also cyclists and they know as they turn right that there is an 80% chance that they will cut off a cyclist if they don't look. so there is also safety
. and tom baker, consumer editor for ktvu channel 2 news. we'll begin with you, tom. tell us what you can about the explosion that shook all of us yesterday. >> it is a remarkable failure because it really shouldn't happen, given all of the protocols in place and all the things that happened to have such a fail-year you wonder. with such a catastrophic failure somebody punched a hole in one of these mains and caused a spark but that doesn't appear to be the case here. something failed in such a catastrophic way that the valves are maybe a mile, two miles apart so now all of this highly compressed gas which is under several hundred pounds of pressure per square inch is venting to the atmosphere. it catches on fire. it becomes a blow torch. it has to work out and while that was happening it was burning up that particular neighborhood. generally speaking, we don't know really what happened. we know there was a significant failure and generally speaking has been my experience in covering all kinds of disasters it's a chain of events rather than a single event but there is plenty going on that
, this is now. fhe former attorney general o these united states back with us now, alberto gonzales. mr. attorney general, . obama has said, o course, he was a leading critic of anof extension of the war on terror iraq and took our eye off the ball and he has now found a way as president to extract us from iraq and focus on ahanistan, but both wars became very unpopular and as mort zuckerman pointed out earlier, afghanistan unpopular now. so back to the argument about fighting terror and whether there's terror fatigue going on in this country. what do you think? >> i think people are tired, they're tired of losing loved ones, quite frankly, neil, and president bush did not anticipate, did not hope, did not want to have men and women fighting overseas indefinitely. he only wanted to order men and women into combat as long as necessary to protect our country. clearly, the conflict in afghanistan is extremely important. we went in originally because the taliban helped provide sanctionry to al-qaeda and one of the things wmbe have to remember, members of al-qaeda, it takes them a long time
>>> hi, everyone, welcome to the "journal" on dw-tv in berlin. the top stories at this hour, u.s. pastor terry jones leaves the world waiting as his career and burning plants sparks outrage in moslem countries. a massive blaze in golf's a san francisco suburb, killing at least four people -- involves a san francisco suburb, killing at least four people. and capping safety costs for nuclear power plants. >>> the united states is preparing to mark the ninth anniversary of the september 11 terrorist attacks on saturday. the pastor's threat to burn the koran on the day has but overshadowing events. he now says he will not go ahead with the burning as long as the new york imam moves at planned islamic cultural center away from ground zero. this has sparked outrage in the muslim world. in afghanistan, angry protesters lashed out at a nato outpost. >> the planned birding has seen thousands of people around the globe take to the streets, like afghanistan. shouting anti-u.s. slogans, they approach this database in the far northeast. the pastors and plans to burn at 200 karans has caused a
. >> it insults muslims and bernie koran could also -- burning the koran could harm u.s. troops. the event was planned for saturday on the nine of -- anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. terry jones is getting criticism from the white house and fbi, but around the world there have already been protests. >> the president was forced to spend a rare news conference making an appeal for tolerance, saying muslims were neighbors and friends. the trouble is it looks as though he is getting more publicity to a group on the fringe. pastor jones is the leader of a church with a congregation of 50. he believes is what is the work of the devil and the threat and to burn korans. he said if forced muslims to abandon a plan to build a center on ground zero. >> we are still very hopeful that we will meet with the imam. >> it seems the koran burning will not happen. >> we are not at war against islam. we are at war against terrorist organizations. they have distorted islam or falsely used the banner of islam to engage in their destructive acts. >> and afghanistan, at the president's word has not been heard. pr
out. they've exempted health and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in
k. we have a real problem. that is not good for business. for us, it is active transport, really important as a solution for being accessible. ok, does it work? yes. this is the city. at the red lines, these are the congestion. this is the pattern of workers who go to work in the morning and in the afternoon. most of the workers come from outside of the city of amsterdam. they come mostly by car, but also a big part from public transport. what was the conclusion of all the businesses? if we go on like this, we have a real big problem in one, two years, maybe a little bit longer, we will not have any mobility anymore in our own region. that was one of the reasons that businesses came together and they were thinking, what can we do, not for a long time because it takes time, but what can we do today that helps today? that is important for the accessibility, and accessibility is very important for good, competition against the other regions in europe. of course, it is very important for the quality of life. if we want to attract international business, we need to attract people from
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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